Davis, de Havilland, Flynn, Cagney, Bogart ...

Davis, de Havilland, Flynn, Cagney, Bogart ...

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

The Genius of Picasso

The eye that saw the world as no one else did.

The masters of great art have been on my mind, and Picasso is one of my great loves.  He captures the human condition in a completely unique way. I am unable to post anything very substantial right now, and a comprehensive biography of Picasso would be difficult because of ongoing computer problems.  However, I would like to share with my Faithful Readers some of my favorites:


Weeping Woman

Picasso painting with light

Girl Before A Mirror
Mother and Child
The Visit - Two Sisters
Romancing Picasso Art within Art Painting by k Madison Moore Inspired by Picasso.
Old Man With Guitar


Guernica

It is very difficult to do justice to Picasso's masterpiece in this forum.
This enormous painting depicts a small Spanish Basque town
obliterated by Nazi bombers during the Spanish Civil War
The last two paintings hang on my living room wall.  If I had to choose just one more, it would be Art Within Art, an explosion of joyous color.  I don't pretend to be a Picasso expert -- I am only self-educated in art that speaks to me.  It is feeling more than knowledge that moves me.  Picasso is not to everybody's taste, but I hope you have found something in these paintings that I particularly love.

19 comments:

  1. Becky, as they say - a picture is worth a thousand words. With Picasso, who needs words? Complex, challenging and ultimately beautiful, the emotional response his art elicits from the viewer makes words seem so inadequate. Thank you for sharing your favorites. You got good taste, girl!

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  2. I spent a summer in Spain, so I got to see quite a bit of the works of Picasso, Dali, and Gaudi. Didn't Anthony Hopkins play Picasso in a movie?

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  3. Wonderful post Becky! Got to see some of his works when I was in Paris back in the early 90's.


    John

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  4. FlickChick, whatever one may think of Picasso's work, it always elicits strong emotion of some type, that's for sure. Thanks, lady!
    Rich, you lucky dog, seeing his originals in Spain! I looked it up, and there was a movie called "Surviving Picasso" with Hopkins. Both men are favorites in their genres -- how did I miss THAT one?!
    John, you are lucky too, going to Paris and seeing his work. I'm glad you enjoyed this.

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  5. I was able to go see his work in SF earlier in the year. Becky, you have seen the film The Mystery Of Picasso, right?

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  6. Michael, I've not heard of The Mystery of Picasso. I just looked it up, and it sounds fascinating, to watch him create. I'll have to try to find it when I've got the moolah to buy it!

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  7. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bvM-I0j5emA&noredirect=1#!

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  8. Anon, I didn't know whether to laugh or go to confession. LOL! I couldn't help but laugh, so I guess I'll have to go -- HILARIOUS!!! And really very sweet...

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  9. Thanks for a wonderful art post, Becky. I must admit though that I am not Picasso's biggest fan. Still, I respect your taste and your judgement. Obviously you've been lucky enough to find something in Picasso's work which might have passed me by.

    My favorite of these is GUERNICA, for the abject horror of it. Don't know if I could live with this one, day to day, though.

    I could, however, live with his Three Musicians, my favorite, I think, of his work. Although now that I think of it, I also like his stark self-portrait as well.

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  10. Nobody seems to have put the full film up on YouTube, but there are scenes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_IbqUZVzQ

    The film is composed of him painting several pieces. This is one of them.

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  11. Hi Yvette -- I like the 3 Musicians and the self-portrait as well. It's funny - you never know why a certain artist touches something in your soul, but he does. I studied a lot about Guernica, and it may seem strange to have it on the wall, but, again, it touches my soul...
    Michael, thank you so much for the video. My computer does not want to play videos right now, but as soon as it's up to speed, I'll come back and watch this.

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  12. Thanks Becky for bringing up Picasso on your blog. One can only imagine what he would have created on film had he turned his talents to that medium too. If you like Picasso you might enjoy the sculptures of Nikki de Saint Phalle, of which there are many scattered around San Diego.

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  13. Thanks Christian! I fond a site for her Tarot Card garden of sculpture -- fascinating. It is so hard, though, to really get the feel of sculpture (well, we're not supposed to touch them - LOL) without having the full all-around perspective, isn't it? I am going to look at some of the other sites with her work...

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  14. Becky - It has been a few years, maybe five, since I last feasted my eyes on "Girl Before a Mirror" at MOMA. It is a painting difficult to leave and I could barely pull myself away from it - kept wandering back to fall under its spell. There is a Picasso Museum in Paris and much as I loved the D'Orsay and was overwhelmed by the Louvre, it was the Picasso we returned to a second time during a visit several years ago.

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  15. Girl Before A Mirror is the same for me -- I would love to see the original some day. It's great to hear from fellow Picasso lovers -- there is something remarkably deep about his vision.

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  16. "It is feeling more than knowledge that moves me." An artist who speaks to your soul has accomplished something rare and beautiful.

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  17. You know CW, I envy artists like that -- not their lives necessarily, since so many of them had hard lives -- but how wonderful to be able to touch people like that...

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  18. Becky, though I'll admit I'm more into Edward Hopper and artists of that ilk, I really enjoyed seeing these Picasso paintings again! I had forgotten how versatile he was as an artist. Thanks for sharing these with us, and Merry Christmas!

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  19. He was like two different artists at times, wasn't he? Realistic and cubist, very original view. I hope your Christmas was as happy as mine!

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